Causes of Hearing Impairment | Hearing Loss Causes
January 24, 2017
The Auditory System and Voice Production
January 27, 2017

Torch Syndrome

TORCH syndrome is a cluster of symptoms.

Synonyms of TORCH Syndrome

  • Toxoplasmosis
  • Other Agents
  • Rubella
  • Cytomegalovirus
  • Herpes Simplex

TORCH Syndrome refers to infection of a developing fetus or newborn by any of a group of infectious agents. “TORCH” is an acronym meaning (T)oxoplasmosis, (O)ther Agents, (R)ubella (also known as German Measles), (C)ytomegalovirus, and (H)erpes Simplex. Infection with any of these agents (i.e., Toxoplasma gondii, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, herpes simplex viruses) may cause a constellation of similar symptoms in affected newborns. These may include fever; difficulties feeding; small areas of bleeding under the skin, causing the appearance of small reddish or purplish spots; enlargement of the liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly); yellowish discoloration of the skin, whites of the eyes, and mucous membranes (jaundice); hearing impairment; abnormalities of the eyes; and/or other symptoms and findings. Each infectious agent may also result in additional abnormalities that may be variable, depending upon a number of factors (e.g., stage of fetal development).

Signs & Symptoms:

If a developing fetus is infected by a TORCH agent, the outcome of the pregnancy may be miscarriage, stillbirth, delayed fetal growth and maturation (intrauterine growth retardation), or early delivery. In addition, newborns infected by any one of the TORCH agents may develop a spectrum of similar symptoms and findings.

Toxoplasmosis is an parasitic infection, found worldwide, may be acquired or transmitted to the developing fetus from an infected mother during pregnancy. In some severely affected newborns, Toxoplasmosis may be associated with abnormal smallness of the head (microcephaly), inflammation of the middle and innermost layers of the eyes (chorioretinitis), calcium deposits in the brain (intracranial calcifications), and/or other abnormalities. (For more information on this disorder, choose “Toxoplasmosis” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Rubella is a viral infection characterized by fever, upper respiratory infection, swelling of the lymph nodes, skin rash, and joint pain. Severely affected newborns and infants may have visual and/or hearing impairment, heart defects, calcium deposits in the brain, and/or other abnormalities. (For more information on this disorder, choose “Rubella” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection is a viral infection that may occur during pregnancy, after birth, or at any age. In severely affected newborns, associated symptoms and findings may include growth retardation, an abnormally small head (microcephaly), enlargement of the liver and spleen (hepatosplenomegaly), inflammation of the liver (hepatitis), low levels of the oxygen-carrying pigment in the blood due to premature destruction of red blood cells (hemolytic anemia), calcium deposits in the brain, and/or other abnormalities. (For more information on this disorder, choose “Cytomegalovirus” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

Herpes is a rare disorder affecting newborns infected with the Herpes simplex virus (HSV). This disorder may vary from mild to severe. In most cases, the disorder is transmitted to an infant from an infected mother with active genital lesions at the time of delivery. In the event that a mother has a severe primary genital outbreak, it is possible that a mother may transmit the infection to the fetus. After delivery, direct contact with either genital or oral herpes sores may result in neonatal herpes. Severely affected newborns may develop fluid-filled blisters on the skin (cutaneous vesicles), lesions in the mouth area, inflammation of the mucous membrane lining the eyelids and whites of the eyes (conjunctivitis), abnormally diminished muscle tone, inflammation of the liver (hepatitis), difficulties breathing, and/or other symptoms and findings. (For more information on this disorder, choose “Neonatal Herpes” as your search term in the Rare Disease Database.)

TORCH syndrome may affect a developing fetus or newborn, potentially resulting in miscarriage, delayed fetal growth and maturation (intrauterine growth retardation), or early delivery.

Reference: Online

https://rarediseases.org/rare-diseases/torch-syndrome/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/TORCH_syndrome

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Talk%3ATORCH_infections

Leave a Reply

avatar
  Subscribe  
Notify of
WhatsApp Us